Nok Yollada

Nok Yollada

A world of difference While some people just hope for change, others, such as Yollada Suanyot, work for it Girl and boy. Beauty and brains. Money making and social benefit generating. After all these years, Yollada “Nok” Suanyot has grown up and become a good mix of many opposites. “I have become a lot more mature and decisive during the past years. In the past, my jobs only dealt with physical appearance. Each day when I woke up, I only thought of how to make myself look good and appealing to others, because it’s part of my jobs in showbiz. Now things have considerably changed and I look at the world from a totally different perspective,” said Yollada, founder and president of the Transfemale Association of Thailand. First introduced to the public as Miss Apza Transvestite (Miss Alcazar Purple Star Award) in 2005, two years later the beauty queen became an artist with Venus Flytrap – Thailand’s first katoey band with a record deal. Several years later, she transformed herself into a human rights activist by founding the Transfemale Association of Thailand and introducing to Thai society the concept of “transfemale” which she referred to as a person being born female, but trapped in a male’s body. And today, the now 30-year-old is wearing many different hats. Aside from running her own jewellery business and a jewellery channel aired via local satellite, Yollada is now working as one of the 24 members of the Nan Provincial Administrative Organisation (PAO). Elected last year, her job is to oversee and inspect whether the provincial management’s works are appropriate and transparent. A...
How to Buy the Book

How to Buy the Book

Bangkok Baby-Ladyboys–Special Edition     Available NOW at Amazon. TEN new chapters and 50 original colour photographs !!NEW!! Available in PRINTED format delivered to your door or as an EBOOK! This is almost a completely new book. Bangkok Baby is still intact telling the story of my nine months amongst the ladyboys of Bangkok and the new book tells the story of my life after meeting Annie and appearing on television. I hope you like it! Buy from Amazon or if you want the ebook at a cheaper price than quoted there, direct by email TO davidbonnies@gmail.com. Bangkok Baby The Inside Story of Ladyboys  ...
Ladyboys the Documentary

Ladyboys the Documentary

Ladyboys the website began like this, one evening in Convent Street or Soi Convent, Silom; It’s hot, fucking hot and humid and just getting dark and I am sweating as I listen to question after question as we stand on the road together. In the way that only journalists can, Charlie and Dee press on regardless, earnestly, sympathetically, apologetically but pressing on is what they must do because they are deep in the shit now. They have made a mistake and now they are making another while trying to undo the first. They are too deadline orientated to care that while they may be able to extract information about Thai ladyboys from inside of my head they will never be able to truly ‘know’ that knowledge; not in their bodies the way that I know. Knowing in the body is where it’s at. Anything less than experiencing with the body is just ‘talking the talk’. Now they are asking me to tell them precisely what ‘walking the walk’ means, assuming that I am able to do that. That assumption is mistake number three, a repeat of mistake number one: asking questions without understanding the source of the answers and believing blindly what they are told. After reading Bangkok Baby, they have asked me to to help them write about Thai ladyboys and tonight they are lucky. I know some of the answers and all of the questions. The where, what, why, and how of ladyboys is galloped through without pause, without understanding. It’s becoming tedious. Then just like that, the night snapped its fingers and the quality of the...
Thailand: Everyman

Thailand: Everyman

She is back in my bed again. She is back in my heart again. As we exit the MRT at Huay Kwang the sky is heavy. ‘It rain’, she says. ‘Storm come’, I say. I ask her why she wants to pray. ‘I think you know Dawid’. I have no idea but I feel nervous for a reason I cannot tell. She holds my hand as I almost trip over the shoes piled at the entrance to the Papikanet shrine at Rachada, Bangkok. Papikanet is what Thai people call Ganesh, the elephant headed god of the Hindus. The Thai animist form of Buddhism adopted Ganesh, the remover of obstacles. The heavy smoke of incense hangs in the air. Can you smell it floating in the humid, still air of the shrine and street outside as it mixes with the cooking smells coming from street traders and car exhausts as the traffic rushes past this place of ornate and fragrant holiness? Sweat is pouring from my head. It is difficult to see. A garland of yellow flowers and a bunch of joss sticks are thrust toward me. She looks at me quizzically as if I should know what to do. She takes my hand again, leads me to a space on the floor. I kneel beside her. I am the only farang (white foreigner) in the shrine. ‘You must have a wish in your heart, koh jai mai, (understand?)’ she asks. ‘Yes’, I say numb with something spiritual? Something momentous feels as if it will happen, something otherworldly? We pray. I glance at her and see she is asking for...
Annie Andasuk.

Annie Andasuk.

Annie’s tight, round ass is rolling in time with the Isaan music blasting across the seated throng. You hold her hips clad in her little denim shorts. She dances raising her hands in the archetypal V sign adopted by all Thai people. She thrusts her ass in your face, laughs and tells you she loves you as you kiss and drink together. You cannot compete with her in the eyes of the watching crowd. Your farang statehood usually draws all eyes but tonight this ladyboy is stealing the show. Tonight you are the Base and she is the Flyer. She is the entertainment and you are the support she needs. Like all exciting dancers she needs to feel something solid beneath her, holding her, loving her. You like this job. You realise that you love her and that the horror and pain of your last Thai ladyboy relationship is almost forgotten. Perhaps not forgotten but accepted, resolved in part and without the sharp pangs of heartache and sadness that have been flooding your emotional landscape for as long as you can remember. Tonight you feel you are waking from a bad dream and like the rest of Thailand, drying out after the floods. The morning light no longer seems so depressing. She smiles, ‘I love you so much my husband, I love YOU’! She shouts over the music. You smile. You believe her. That’s a new experience. But it almost never happened, did it? You remember Pattaya in September. You have gone to fetch her back to Bangkok realising you want to be with her but the face and...